Butterfly or Moth? 

Grade : 1-­3 

Subject 

Language Arts/Science/Technology/Art

Materials

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/butterfly/allabout/Bflyormoth.shtml
Art Center with art materials
Butterfly/Moth displays in classroom
Computer access

Goals 
Students will be able to identify the differences and similarities between a moth and a
butterfly.
Students will be able to research specific moths and butterflies on the computer.
Students will be able to make artist creations of butterflies and moths.

Objectives

Given the information and introduction to moths and butterflies, the students will
research a butterfly and a moth, listing at least three differences and similarities
between the two.

After researching a butterfly and a moth, the students will make artistic creations
of each of them, showing color, structure, likenesses and differences of both.

Introduction

The teacher will prepare for this lesson by posting pictures or hanging pictures from the
ceiling of butterflies and moths.  Have a sign outside the classroom, “Welcome to the
Sanctuary of Moths and Butterflies”.  Explain that a sanctuary is a special place
where there is protection and safety.  Give them a chance to investigate the pictures
and discuss similarities and differences with their partner.

Gather the students together and ask them about their discoveries.  List what they have
noticed on a chart for display.

Development of Lesson

Can you tell the difference between a butterfly and a moth? At first glance, the two
insect species have identical body structures ­ they both have one pair of antennae, two
pairs of wings, and three pairs of legs. Even their diet is the same. Both of them love
drinking sugary liquids (such as nectar) through a long, straw­like feeding tube called a
proboscis. When a butterfly or a moth is not eating, it coils up its proboscis and stores it
neatly under its head.

Aside from the similarities, there are some differences between the two winged
insect species:

A butterfly is usually more brightly colored than a moth.
A butterfly has a small, rounded knob at the tip of its antenna. A moth doesn’t
have the knob, and its antenna is either straight or feather­like.
We often see a butterfly during the day and a moth during the night.
A butterfly likes to rest with its wings folded upright over its back. A moth prefers
to hold its wings flat.
A butterfly has a long, slender body. A moth, in contrast, has a short, plump,
hairy body.

Practice
After the introduction to butterflies and moths is completed, the students will be given a
partner to work with.  They will use the computer to research one moth and one
butterfly.  The website below is an example to be used by the students.

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/butterfly/allabout/Bflyormoth.shtml

Students will look at the details of the moth and butterfly and will find at least three
differences and similarities.  They will then go to the art center and use materials of their
choice to recreate the moth and butterfly they have been assigned to research.

Closure 

After the students have completed their task, they will return to the group to display their
creations.  Each partnership will be assigned a different moth and butterfly to
investigate.  They will each take turns explaining their creation.  These can be displayed
in the hall or bulletin board.

Evaluation 

Students will be evaluated on following instructions of their design: Three differences
and similarities, details, and artist design.